National Healthy Eating Day

Even though I am a day late, Wednesday November 8th, 2012 was the National Healthy Eating Day. Go check out what your nutrition expert 😉 has to say about it: Healthy Eating Day

Make the most out of healthy eating before the holidays.

Monitor your portion sizes, watch the salt shaker, as well as the “Salty Six” (taken from aha.org)

Here’s a quick look at the Salty Six, the top sources for sodium in today’s diet:
  • Breads and rolls. We all know breads and rolls add carbohydrates and calories, but salt, too? It can be deceiving because a lot of bread doesn’t even taste salty, but one piece can have as much as 230 milligrams of sodium. That’s about 15 percent of the recommended amount from only one slice, and it adds up quickly. Have two sandwiches in one day? The bread alone could put you close to  1,000 milligrams of sodium.
  • Cold cuts and cured meats. Even foods that would otherwise be considered healthy may have high levels of sodium. Deli or pre-packaged turkey can contain as much as 1,050 milligrams of sodium.  It’s added to most cooked meats so they don’t spoil after a few days.
  • Pizza. OK, everybody knows pizza’s not exactly a health food, because of cholesterol, fat and calories. But pizza’s plenty salty, too. One slice can contain up to 760 milligrams of sodium, so two can send you over the daily recommendation.
  • Poultry. Surely chicken can’t be bad for you, right?  Sodium levels in poultry can vary based on preparation methods.  You will find a wide range of sodium in poultry products, so it is important to choose wisely.  Reasonable portions of lean, skinless, grilled chicken are ok but may still contain an added sodium solution. And when you start serving up the chicken nuggets, the sodium also adds up. Just 3 ounces of frozen and breaded nuggets can add nearly 600 milligrams of sodium.
  • Soup. This is another one of those foods that seems perfectly healthy. It can’t be bad if Mom gave it to you for the sniffles, right? But when you take a look at the nutrition label it’s easy to see how too much soup can quickly turn into a sodium overload. One cup of canned chicken noodle soup can have up to 940 milligrams of sodium.  And remember that soup cans typically contain more than one serving.
  • Sandwiches. This covers everything from grilled cheese to hamburgers. We already know that breads and cured meats may be heavy on the sodium. Add them together, then add a little ketchup or mustard and you can easily surpass 1,500 milligrams of sodium in one sitting.

xoxo,

Katie

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